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Photo by Sharon Jungert

Cornerstones of Law and Liberty Plaza


It is the intent of the City Council to recognize our cultural past.  We do not endorse, in any way, any religion.

The Cornerstones of Law and Liberty were dedicated by City Council on October 27, 2001.

The City Council dedicates this display to remind us of our heritage and to empower us to fight for our liberty and freedom. Without knowledge of our past, we cannot protect our future. As Thomas Jefferson said in 1816, "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be."

Cornerstones of law and liberty plaza

The display consists of the following monuments

  • Bill of Rights
  • Declaration of Independence
  • Mayflower Compact
  • Magna Carta
  • Preamble to the Constitution
  • Ten Commandments

The Magna Carta and the Declaration of Independence are excerpts from the original documents. Grammar and spelling for all monuments have been left as in the original versions. The italicized text indicates the exact wording on the keystones.

Rules of Law, Our Charter, and our Constitution

The Rules of Law, Our Charter, and Our Constitution

It is the intent of the City Council to recognize our cultural past.  We do not endorse, in any way, any religion.

We respect the good intentions of the Fraternal Order of Eagles in presenting the Ten Commandments monument to our community during the decade of the 1950's when Congress adopted our national motto: "In God We Trust." That same decade, Congress included "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance. During the 1950's, the Cold War prompted many changes in our national spirit.

We are mindful that this 21st century brings a new diversity of citizens. We must strive to make our government sensitive to the values of Americans with minority views, whether religious, politicial or otherwise.